Berkshire and The War: the "Reading Standard" pictorial record. Volume 2. p 289

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Title Berkshire and The War: the "Reading Standard" pictorial record. Volume 2. p289
Date 1917
Page number 289
Publisher Unknown
Description Not available
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BRITISH PRISONERS OF WAR DAY

Snowdrops to Symbolise Hope

British prisoners of war are not the least of the causes for which flag and badge days have been held in Berkshire. Internment in Germany and Austria, the people of this country have been taught to realise, is an experience of pitiful weariness and privation, and popular sympathy with captured members of the Royal Berks Regiment expressed itself in support of a fund initiated by Mr (now Colonel) W.A. Mount, M.P. for the relief of those enduring a wretched exile. Of the collections in Reading on New Year's Day 1916, half was devoted to the prisoners of the Royal Berks Regiment, ten per cent. to the County and Borough Police in enemy hands and the balance to the Prisoners of War Central Fund. Each donor received a hand-made imitation of the floral emblem of hope, the snowdrop, or a specially-designed disc depicting an angel succouring a captive. A band of ladies volunteered to collect, and they showed splendid devotion despite the persistent attempts of Jupiter Pluvius to freshen their baskets of snowdrops. Success so much attended the scheme, that £388 15s 11d was collected and £161 4s 1d otherwise subscribed, making a total of £550. The hon. secretary of the committee was Mrs W.P. Colebrook, and other leading workers were Mrs Downing Fullerton, Mrs W.M. Colebrook and Mr W.A. Mount, M.P.

"Decorating" the Reading Standard photographer (C.E. May), now an R.E. despatch rider. Every Tommy Atkins wearshis snowdrop or medallion.

"Snowdrops" shelter from the raindrops. Photo by C.E. May.






BRITISH PRISONERS OF WAR DAY

Snowdrops to Symbolise Hope

British prisoners of war are not the least of the causes for which flag and badge days have been held in Berkshire. Internment in Germany and Austria, the people of this country have been taught to realise, is an experience of pitiful weariness and privation, and popular sympathy with captured members of the Royal Berks Regiment expressed itself in support of a fund initiated by Mr (now Colonel) W.A. Mount, M.P. for the relief of those enduring a wretched exile. Of the collections in Reading on New Year's Day 1916, half was devoted to the prisoners of the Royal Berks Regiment, ten per cent. to the County and Borough Police in enemy hands and the balance to the Prisoners of War Central Fund. Each donor received a hand-made imitation of the floral emblem of hope, the snowdrop, or a specially-designed disc depicting an angel succouring a captive. A band of ladies volunteered to collect, and they showed splendid devotion despite the persistent attempts of Jupiter Pluvius to freshen their baskets of snowdrops. Success so much attended the scheme, that £388 15s 11d was collected and £161 4s 1d otherwise subscribed, making a total of £550. The hon. secretary of the committee was Mrs W.P. Colebrook, and other leading workers were Mrs Downing Fullerton, Mrs W.M. Colebrook and Mr W.A. Mount, M.P.

"Decorating" the Reading Standard photographer (C.E. May), now an R.E. despatch rider. Every Tommy Atkins wearshis snowdrop or medallion.

"Snowdrops" shelter from the raindrops. Photo by C.E. May.




Snowdrops to Symbolise Hope

British prisoners of war are not the least of the causes for which flag and badge days have been held in Berkshire. Internment in Germany and Austria, the people of this country have been taught to realise, is an experience of pitiful weariness and privation, and popular sympathy with captured members of the Royal Berks Regiment expressed itself in support of a fund initiated by Mr (now Colonel) W.A. Mount, M.P. for the relief of those enduring a wretched exile. Of the collections in Reading on New Year's Day 1916, half was devoted to the prisoners of the Royal Berks Regiment, ten per cent. to the County and Borough Police in enemy hands and the balance to the Prisoners of War Central Fund. Each donor received a hand-made imitation of the floral emblem of hope, the snowdrop, or a specially-designed disc depicting an angel succouring a captive. A band of ladies volunteered to collect, and they showed splendid devotion despite the persistent attempts of Jupiter Pluvius to freshen their baskets of snowdrops. Success so much attended the scheme, that £388 15s 11d was collected and £161 4s 1d otherwise subscribed, making a total of £550. The hon. secretary of the committee was Mrs W.P. Colebrook, and other leading workers were Mrs Downing Fullerton, Mrs W.M. Colebrook and Mr W.A. Mount, M.P.

"Decorating" the Reading Standard photographer (C.E. May), now an R.E. despatch rider. Every Tommy Atkins wearshis snowdrop or medallion.

"Snowdrops" shelter from the raindrops. Photo by C.E. May.







BRITISH PRISONERS OF WAR DAY

Snowdrops to Symbolise Hope

British prisoners of war are not the least of the causes for which flag and badge days have been held in Berkshire. Internment in Germany and Austria, the people of this country have been taught to realise, is an experience of pitiful weariness and privation, and popular sympathy with captured members of the Royal Berks Regiment expressed itself in support of a fund initiated by Mr (now Colonel) W.A. Mount, M.P. for the relief of those enduring a wretched exile. Of the collections in Reading on New Year's Day 1916, half was devoted to the prisoners of the Royal Berks Regiment, ten per cent. to the County and Borough Police in enemy hands and the balance to the Prisoners of War Central Fund. Each donor received a hand-made imitation of the floral emblem of hope, the snowdrop, or a specially-designed disc depicting an angel succouring a captive. A band of ladies volunteered to collect, and they showed splendid devotion despite the persistent attempts of Jupiter Pluvius to freshen their baskets of snowdrops. Success so much attended the scheme, that £388 15s 11d was collected and £161 4s 1d otherwise subscribed, making a total of £550. The hon. secretary of the committee was Mrs W.P. Colebrook, and other leading workers were Mrs Downing Fullerton, Mrs W.M. Colebrook and Mr W.A. Mount, M.P.

"Decorating" the Reading Standard photographer (C.E. May), now an R.E. despatch rider. Every Tommy Atkins wearshis snowdrop or medallion.

"Snowdrops" shelter from the raindrops. Photo by C.E. May.